Story of Two Frogs: Plight of our ‘low arousal people’ (by Shiva Kant Jha)

Story of Two Frogs: Plight of our ‘low arousal people’

                      “Now things every bit as wild as this are being received in silence every day. All strokes slip on the smoothness of a polished wall. All blows fall soundless on the softness of a padded cell.”    G.K. Chesterton

                     A society, which keeps on accepting aberrations and  injustice over a long time, is most unfortunate. Massive strokes of injustice, when suddenly inflicted, lead to powerful reaction. But when they come in low doses, the victims keep adjusting with them.  This process of adjustment destroys  the capacity to react to  make their lot better.  We cannot enjoy sojourn on a plateau: if we cannot go up, we must go down. . This brings to my mind a story of  two frogs which a naughty boy had caught for his macabre  play. He hurled one into a pan of boiling water. The frog reacted with instant verve, and  jumped out to  fall with a thud  on the green grass. So it survived. The second frog  enjoyed the cool water. But the boy  set fire wood ablaze under the pan in which the frog rested with delight. The water which was cool and comfortable was getting  warmer & warmer. Then it felt that water was getting warmer, then inconvenient, and then inclement.. The unlucky frog fritted away its energy in the process of adjusting  with  its  circumstances as getting shaped. And it died.

            The tragedy that was wrought at Kurukshetra (as portrayed in the Mahabharata ) could have been avoided if persons like Bhishma, Drone, and Kripacharya would have refused to keep on adjusting with the circumstances wrought by Duryodhana.  

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The Sphota: KRISHNA DARSHANA (By Shiva Kant Jha)

An Apology to my readers. The unrevised two comments on Krishna Katha got loaded by mistake. Their corrected versions are now placed in the public domain. Sorry for inconvenience.

The Sphota: KRISHNA DARSHANA

(By Shiva Kant Jha)

I  felt the cosmos exploded with an incessant shower of sparks, some big enough to subsume countless suns, some so small as not be enough even for a neutron to get parked. The sparks seemed to form waves in which the particles seem to move through variations with the fastest imaginable speed,  all shrouded in mystery. I saw a little of what was being unfolded without understanding what all that meant.

          It is amazing to notice that the blue sky was itself advancing (or receding) towards a realm that seemed to begin where the blue seemed to softly merge in the realm of ‘darkness’ the intensity and tone of which seemd to increase more and more. What was happening in that realm of darkness couldn’t be seen. All the sparks were fading out by slipping into that realm of dense darkness.

            It was amazing to see through spectra the   countless universes emerging and melting inside a spark whose number no supercomputer could  ever count. I felt I saw the dance of Lord Shiva going on even in the tiniest particles. It was an alluringly and frightening experience, even  to my astral body! Then I  heard, or I  felt I  heard, the sound of Krishna’s flute. The sound was no ordinary sound. At times it seemed emanating from the conch, at times from damru, at times from the flute we are familiar with. Besides, it had countless other   sound patterns and effects which I  could neither explore, nor imagine, nor understand. It seemed that the whole that I had seen was  getting revealed in that sound. It was strange to see and feel  in light and sound the same symmetry, same idiom, and the same symbiosis.

             When I  go back to those moments, whose memory has almost faded, I  feel I  had the luck to witness the sphota (‘the explosion’) coming from the imageries , the ultimate building-blocks for our experience and/or thought in this vast creation. . This word in Sanskrit poetics is difficult to be translated into English as there is no synonym. But I do not know whether the sphota was in  exterior world that I  had seen, or inside myself. In fact, the duality ceases when there is sphota. In yoga, the sphota gives rise to naad that advances up towards the point of perfection. The yogis believe that naad is inherent in everything that universe contains. When it acquires attributes, it expresses itself in the phenomenal world, and reveals itself  in the  seven swaras in which creation sings the  music of creativity. What comes from  Shiva’s damru, and Krishna’s bansuri (flute?), becomes  O’m that contains the cosmic creativity in which destruction and creation become the same.  It is interesting to note that when Kabirdas thought about the  mission of his life, he asked himself to advance towards that great delight that is thus  captured by his words building rich imagery that provides sweetness and light without limits:

Phaguna ke din chaar re holi khel mana re.

           My  yoganidra lasted for a few minutes, but to  me it seemed that eons had passed. That ‘blue sky’, that ‘light’, and that ‘sound’ I could remember for long, experiencing wonder that can express itself only through silence.

                (  at Indirapuram: New Delhi  Oct., 2013)

IN SEARCH OF IDIOMS TO EXPRESS MYSELF: KRISHNA KATHA (by Shiva Kant Jha)

An Apology to my readers. The unrevised two comments on Krishna Katha got loaded by mistake. Their corrected versions are now placed in the public domain. Sorry for inconvenience.

IN SEARCH OF IDIOMS TO EXPRESS MYSELF: KRISHNA KATHA

(by Shiva Kant Jha)

           Years rolled, but I carried the memory of what I  felt I  had seen in those moments  which I try to portray in a few lines.

             I  got caught in the affairs of the world, to think and do things which Lewis Caroll would call, about the kings and cabbage. But off and on I  could recall a little of the darshana that  had left me amazed but exploring;  but for what ? I  knew not. Moments seemed  figure themselves into days, weeks, months and years in the continuum about which I  had no clear vision. But I realised that the pleasure of that memory was obsessive and over-gripping.  This inner quest enriched me in ways without number, but I  could not  express anything about them in the manner we are accustomed to do in our worldly intercourse.   I needed right idioms to express, I  needed right metaphor to express, what passed in my mind. My reflections have enabled me to find in Krishna both ideas and idioms; I have found in Krishna Katha the right metaphors, or what T.S. Eliot calls an “objective correlative”, and he explains this concept with utmost precision in his The Sacred Wood: Essays on Poetry and Criticism (1922):

                 ‘The only way of expressing emotion in the form of art is by finding an “objective correlative” ; in other words, a set of objects, a situation, a chain of events which shall be the formula of that particular emotion; such that when the external facts, which must terminate in sensory experience, are given, the emotion is immediately evoked.’

             I realised that only in poetry I  could express what I  had seen. I  feel no better instance of the capacity of ‘poetry’ to explore the ‘wonder’ of the cosmic flux can be conceived than what we get  in Krishna, and Krishna Katha. I felt our great rishis and poets had realised. Bohr realised this whilst trying to understand and express the inner word of an ‘atom’. It is amazing, and baffling, that moments come, points are reached, when the art of understanding  has a common tryst:  whether it is an atom or a galaxy;  whether it is a piercing thorn or a rose petal caught in the curl of a damsel’s cheek, or  the cosmic flux of waves and particles, or the be-all and end-all in the mouth of   Krishna in his cosmic manifestation (vishwaroop) about which the Bhagavad-Gita says in its Chapter 11,   that even Arjuna could not bear to see. After seeing the Lord of the Universe, Arjuna breaks into fine poetry with the imageries richer than those I  ever read, and thought about (see shlokas 28-29 of the said  Chapter. ) 

          I was amazed when years later I read about Niels Bohr’s paper On the Constitution of Atoms and Molecules. J. Brownoski writes in his Ascent of Man (at p. 340) that  Bhor said to Heisenberg, ‘When it comes to atoms, language can be used only as in poetry. The Poet, too is not nearly so concerned with describing facts but creating images’. Brownoski aptly commented: ‘That is an unexpected thought: when it comes to atoms, language is not describing facts but creating images. But it is so. What lies below the visible world is always imaginary, in the literal sense: a play of images. There is no other way to talk about the invisible – in nature, in art, or in science.’ He found that ‘Niels Bohr had built a world inside the atom by going beyond the laws of physics as they had stood for two centuries after Newton.’    He developed his ideas within the frame  of  reference that the atomic physicist had found for his quest. He said:

             ‘When we step through the gateway of the atom we are in a world which our sense cannot experience. There is a new architecture there, a way that things are put together which we cannot know: we only try to picture it by analogy, a new act of imagination. The architectural images come from the concrete world of our senses, because that is the only world that words describe. But all our ways of picturing the invisible are metaphors, likenesses that we snatch form the larger world of eye and ear and touch.’  

I  have told you about T.S. Eliot and Niels Bhor because their ideas have helped me to understand a little of that I  call ‘Krishna’. Do not laugh at me, my readers. I  know what vexes you, or makes you laugh at me. I do not erect the barriers of time and space in my quest reflecting on the ideas and emotions which come to me. The cosmic grammar has no frontiers.  

                                                                 (  at Indirapuram: Oct.6, 2013)

 

The Sphota: KRISHNA DASHANA (By Shiva Kant Jha)

The Sphota: KRISHNA DASHANA

(By Shiva Kant Jha)

I  felt the cosmos exploded with an incessant shower of sparks, some big enough to subsume countless suns, some so small as not be enough even for a neutron to get parked. The sparks seemed to form waves in which the particles seem to move through variations with the fastest imaginable speed all shrouded in mystery. I saw a little of what was being unfolded without understanding what all that meant.

          It is amazing to notice that the blue sky was itself advancing (or receding) towards a realm that seemed to begin where the blue seemed to softly merge in the realm of ‘darkness’ the intensity and tone of which seem to increase. What was happening in that realm of darkness couldn’t be seen. All the sparks were fading out by slipping into that realm.

            It was amazing to see through spectra the   countless universes emerging and melting inside a spark whose number no supercomputer could count. Whatever aperture through the spectrum could be got, I saw the dance of Lord Shiva going on even in the tiniest parts. It was an alluringly frightening experience, perhaps to my astral body. Then I  heard, or I  felt I  heard the sound of Krishna’s flute. The sound was no ordinary sound. At times it seemed emanating from the conch, at times from damru, at times from the flute we are familiar with. Besides, it had countless other   sound patterns and effects which I  could neither explore, nor imagine. It seemed that whole that I saw getting revealed in that sound. It was strange to see in light and sound the same symmetry, same idiom, the same symbiosis.

             When my goes back to those moments, whose memory has almost faded now, I  feel I  had the luck to witness the sphota (‘the explosion’) coming from the imageries, the ultimate building-blocks for our experience, and/or thought. This word in Sanskrit poetics is difficult to be translated into English as there is no synonym. But I do not now whether the sphota was in  exterior world that I  had seen, or inside myself. In fact, the duality cease when there is sphota. In yoga, the sphota gives rise to naad that advances up towards the point of perfection. The yogis believe that naad is inherent in everything that universe contains. When it acquires attributes it expresses itself in the phenomenal world, but expressively in the  seven swaras in which creation sang its music of creativity; and which we imagine best expressed in Shiva’s damru, and Krishna’s bansuri (flute?). But when its attributes cease, it becomes just O’m that symbolises and expresses the  entire creative process. It is interesting to note that when Kabirdas thought of what best mission in life he should devote himself, he asked himself to advance towards that great delight the perfection of which are thus captured by his words bulding rich imagery.

Phaguna ke din chaar re holi khel mana re.

           My  yoganidra lasted for a few minutes, but for me it seemed hat eons had passed. That ‘blue sky’, that ‘light’, and that ‘sound’ I could remember for long, through mysteriously haze no doubt. I have reflected on them in my later years with a measure of fidelity that I  could muster.

                (  at Indirapuram: New Delhi  Oct., 2013)

IN SEARCH OF IDIOMS TO EXPRESS MYSELF: KRISHNA KATHA (by Shiva Kant Jha)

 IN SEARCH OF IDIOMS TO EXPRESS MYSELF: KRISHNA KATHA

(by Shiva Kant Jha)

           Years rolled, but I carried the memory of what I  felt I  had seen in those moments  which I  have tried to portray in a few lines. I  got caught in the affairs of the world, to think and do things which Lewis Caroll would call, about the kings and cabbage. But off and on I  could recall a little of darshana that left me amazed but exploring, but for what I  knew not. Moments seemed to on figure themselves into days, weeks, months and years in the continuum about which I  had no clear vision. But I realised that the pleasure of that memory was obsessive and over-gripping.  This inner quest enriched me in ways without number, but I  could not  express anything about them in the manner we are accustomed in our worldly intercourse.   I needed right idioms to express, I  needed right metaphor to express what passed in my mind. My reflections have enabled me to find in Krishna both ideas and idioms; I have found in Krishna Katha the right metaphors, or what T.S. Eliot calls an “objective correlative”, and explains this concept with utmost precision in his The Sacred Wood: Essays on Poetry and Criticism (1922):

                 ‘The only way of expressing emotion in the form of art is by finding an “objective correlative” ; in other words, a set of objects, a situation, a chain of events which shall be the formula of that particular emotion; such that when the external facts, which must terminate in sensory experience, are given, the emotion is immediately evoked.’

             I realised that only in poetry it could be possible to say something what I  had seen. I  feel no better instance of the capacity of ‘poetry’ to explore the ‘wonder’ of the cosmic flux can be imagined than in Krishna and Krishna Katha. I felt our great rishis and poets had realised this just the way  Bohr realised whilst trying to understand and express the inner word of an ‘atom’. It is amazing, and baffling, that moments come, points are reached, when the art of understanding, even a little, is the same whether it is an atom or a galaxy, whether a rose petal caught in the curl of a damsel’s cheek, or of those in the mouth of   Krishna in his cosmic manifestation (vishwaroop) about which the Bhagavad-Gita says in its Chapter 11,      that even Arjuna could not bear to see. After seeing the Lord of the Universe, the most ondrous Cosmic Person without limits of any sort, Arjuna breaks into fine poetry with the imageries richer than which I have neither read nor hard, nor thought :see shlokas 28-29 of the said  Chapter.   

          I was amazed when years later I read about Niels Bohr’s paper On the Constitution of Atoms and Molecules. J. Brownoski writes in his Ascent of Man (at p. 340) that  Bhor said to Heisenberg, ‘When it comes to atoms, language can be used only as in poetry. The Poet, too is not nearly so concerned with describing facts but creating images’. Brownoski aptly commented: ‘That is an unexpected thought: when it comes to atoms, language is not describing facts but creating images. But it is so. What lies below the visible world is always imaginary, in the literal sense: a play of images. There is no other way to talk about the invisible – in nature, in art, or in science.’ He found that ‘Niels Bohr had built a world inside the atom by going beyond the laws of physics as they had stood for two centuries after Newton.’    He developed his ideas within the range of the reference that the atomic physicist had found for his quest. He said:

             ‘When we step through the gateway of the atom we are in a world which our sense cannot experience. There is a new architecture there, a way that things are put together which we cannot know: we only try to picture it by analogy, a new act of imagination. The architectural images come from the concrete world of our senses, because that is the only world that words describe. But all our ways of picturing the invisible are metaphors, likenesses that we snatch form the larger world of eye and ear and touch.’  

I  have told you about T.S. Eliot and Niels Bhor because their ideas have helped me to understand a little of that I  call ‘Krishna’. Do not laugh at me, my readers. I  know what vexes you, or makes you laugh at me. I do not erect the barriers of time and space in my quest reflecting on the ideas and emotions which come to me. The cosmic grammar has no frontiers.  

                                                                 (  at Indirapuram: Oct.6, 2013)

S.K. JHA – A multi – faceted personality, The Nagpur Times, Nagpur, NAGPUR, MAY 13, [1992]

NOTE:            This S.K.Jha was the Commissioner  of Income-Tax  for Vidarbha  at Nagpur during 1986 to 1992. This article on  him came out in  Nagpur Times after his transfer to Calcutta in 1992.  This contains his ideas on  Man,  Life and Death,  God,  economics and taxes. Thus he yoked together important, even  discordant  ideas, arbitrarily together. The sublime and the ridiculous  come close!   I  feel that though more than two decades have gone, Time has yet not made those comments stale.                                                   [ Shiva Kant Jha on Oct. 5, 2013].

 

 

 

The Nagpur Times, Nagpur

NAGPUR, MAY 13,  [1992]

S.K. JHA – A multi – faceted personality

By Anju Hirani     

NAGPUR, MAY 13

           A calm and cool man, with intelligent eyes and serenity writ large on his face. An Income Tax Commissioner, a lecturer,  an advocate,  a voracious reader, a man who compares God with a calmpose tablet, who can speak for hours on any subject under the sun,  his desk scattered with books on various topics, ranging from on various topics, ranging from City of Joy to Shri Aurobindo’s Upanishads.

     You put all the things together and what do you get  — a  man of moods. Mr. Shiva Kant Jha, the  income Tax Commissioner of Nagpur who has recently been transferred’ to Calcutta after six years of stay in Nagpur. He shared his memories, experiences, likes and dislikes with Nagpur Times.

      Life in Nagpur

     “My graph of life in Nagpur had a lot of ups and downs. I was promoted to the post of Commissioner of Income Tax when I came to Nagpur. My daughter got married in Nagpur. I had two grand children here. Man’s wish to be immortal is fulfilled through this process and the graph peaked during this period. Then I suffered a massive. heart attack and the line dipped low. My son topped his LLB. exams. and the line turned upwards once more. My indifferent health made the line plunge low again.”

 

     “Initially when I came to Nagpur, I wanted to go back. After a year, I developed a liking for it, and two years I started enjoying my stay here”.

      “Nagpur has special place in my heart. People oF Nagpur are by and large law abiding, peaceful and quite affectionate. But they are less responsive to challenges. Their psychology is that, if things are going in a particular way, then let them continue that way. The people in Nagpur are happy and satisfied lot. Some more endeavour  should be made to make the people more dynamic, more assertive for bettering things rather than be happy with what they have”.

       “This is necessary for developing the economy of Vidarbha.  In 1991, the revenue collection in Vidarbha was 100 crores and in 1991-92. It was 125 crores so the growth process is there but there is substantial scope for further growth”.

       Talking about Vidarbha, he said that  “it is here that Gandhiji floated his Charkha policy. Gandhiji’s idea of Charkha was the more  revolutionary idea than any economics in the world has known”.

      “The Charkha provided meaningfulness to life, and dignity to an individual Charkha in every household would have made every household a centre of productivity, This is what is needed in India, a  creative process of nation building”.

           “If there is productive activity going on in all households, then the young boys and girls won’t engage in unfair means practices and so on”.

      “We should put the Principles of Mahatma Gandhi in practice. The Gandhian thought should be an important component in forming our economic and fiscal policies.”

    Plus & Minus Points

    He smiled when I asked him his plus and minus points. I have so many minus points that if I be the judge, I’d sentence myself with heaviest punishment It is persons of Gandhiji’s caliber who could list their follies for others to benefit from, but ordinary individuals like me cannot expose them to  others I don’t were my heart on my sleeves for fools to stare at “. Mr. Jha srnilingly quoted Othello.

     “As far as my points are concerned, I am on incorrigible optimist. I am happy with whatever life has given me. I believe human potentialities are infinite. I have explored a little and would like to keep on exploring till the curtain falls”.

 

     Rebirth

     “Who would you like to be reborn as? The question had him in deep comtemplation for a long time before he slowly said,  “I never thought of it because I never believed in it I believe in modem physics. I believe that whatever is right in me will remain so even after my  death. Something in me may become the smile of charming young girl, and something else in me may become the frown of a ferocious tiger”.

     “I have never been able to convince myself that there is rebirth, though my father and mother believed in it”. After heading around a lot, he said. “I would like to be born as a human being, but no human being appears to me to be a model who can be accepted without any modification. The liberty to design myself, I keep as my sovereign right”.

     “He’s voracious reader.  Tulsidas and Shakespeare have impressed him the most, though he finds Shakespeare more inviting, and feels more at home in his world.”

      “The world of Tulsidas is one of faith, profound conviction and infinite dedication”, he says, “We live in a world of waste and destruction Thus we have so many friends in the world of Shakespeare, and none in the world of Kalidas,  after Shakespeare He made every story a metaphor and that is something very remarkable.”

 

       “Out of all Shakespeare’s work he  prefers the Shakespeare tragedies, “Macbeth”, Othello”, “Hamlet” etc. They represent the pcak of his creativity. His other favourites  are the  “Old testament,  and the “Ramcharitra Manas”.

       View on God

       “Do you believe in God? I asked him.  “It’s a very tough question”, he mused.  “At times I feel Gods are the most magnificent creations of human eings. Whether they exist or not,  they do have impact”.

    “In moments of distress I get solace when feelings are ruffled, I get Peace. When all is lost I feel profound is still surviving when everyone is gone, something very personal is providing company”.

    “I feel without faith in God, it would be difficult to live as life’s  pangs and sufferings would be unbearable without faith in God. Hope cannot survive and without hope, life cannot be worth living. So I do feel that the most intense creative human imagination created God”.

    “Remembering his days in the hospital, he said:  “When someone is placed on the operation table for some serious operation then one acquires serenity of mind and hope by surrendering oneself to God.”.

     “I perceived my doctor as that and surrendered myself to him. It  is this which sustained me. I believe it is your faith which sustains you. This faith in God is something which supports when all supports are gone”.

     “He compared God to a calmpose tablet saying that both give you peace of mind. He never realized, I suppose that an overdose of the latter leads one straight to God.”

     On Corruption

     “Answering a querry on alleged corruption by revenue collecting authorities, Mr. Jha said: “There is no country in the world where in some measure corruption is not present There are lot of reasons for it, besides the economic reason.”

     “Despite the efforts by the department to eradicate corruption the problem is very much there. Various agencies of the department are functioning to look into the public grievances.  The Grievance Cell in Commissioner’s Office, Central Board of Direct Taxes in New Delhi, Vigilance officers, besides various other government agencies, are  investigating into complaints of corruption.”

      “The general level of performance in dept. is fine though there is scope for improvement. This year a lot of stress is being given for improving our public relations.”

      On Direct Taxes

      “The national revenue from Income Tax is just one or two percent. Why  isn’t it just done away with?   I asked.”        

      “This issue was considered in United Kingdom also. I feel we should not do away with direct taxes. The indirect taxes hit all. Direct taxes are imposed on those capable of bearing the burden. By making them tax payers we make them conscious partners in the development of Nations. So  they should not be done away with.”

    Au Revolr

    “Getting a wee bit emotional in the end, he said “when I first came to Nagpur in 1965 as a Probation Officer, I wrote an article in Nagpur Times on Jean-Paul Sartre who had refused to accept the Nobel Prize for literature. It’s a wonderful coincidence that now when I am leaving Nagpur, Nagpur Times is featuring me”. 

*****ImageImage

S.K. JHA – A multi – faceted personality (Nagpur Times, May 13, 1992

NOTE:            This S.K.Jha was the Commissioner  of Income-Tax  for Vidarbha  at Nagpur during 1986 to 1992. This article on  him came out in  Nagpur Times after his transfer to Calcutta in 1992.  This contains his ideas on  Man,  Life and Death,  God,  economics and taxes. Thus he yoked together important, even  discordant  ideas, arbitrarily together. The sublime and the ridiculous  come close!   I  feel that though more than two decades have gone, Time has yet not made those comments stale.                                                   [ Shiva Kant Jha on Oct. 5, 2013].

 

 

 

The Nagpur Times, Nagpur

NAGPUR, MAY 13,  [1992]

S.K. JHA – A multi – faceted personality

By Anju Hirani     

NAGPUR, MAY 13

           A calm and cool man, with intelligent eyes and serenity writ large on his face. An Income Tax Commissioner, a lecturer,  an advocate,  a voracious reader, a man who compares God with a calmpose tablet, who can speak for hours on any subject under the sun,  his desk scattered with books on various topics, ranging from on various topics, ranging from City of Joy to Shri Aurobindo’s Upanishads.

     You put all the things together and what do you get  — a  man of moods. Mr. Shiva Kant Jha, the  income Tax Commissioner of Nagpur who has recently been transferred’ to Calcutta after six years of stay in Nagpur. He shared his memories, experiences, likes and dislikes with Nagpur Times.

      Life in Nagpur

     “My graph of life in Nagpur had a lot of ups and downs. I was promoted to the post of Commissioner of Income Tax when I came to Nagpur. My daughter got married in Nagpur. I had two grand children here. Man’s wish to be immortal is fulfilled through this process and the graph peaked during this period. Then I suffered a massive. heart attack and the line dipped low. My son topped his LLB. exams. and the line turned upwards once more. My indifferent health made the line plunge low again.”

 

     “Initially when I came to Nagpur, I wanted to go back. After a year, I developed a liking for it, and two years I started enjoying my stay here”.

      “Nagpur has special place in my heart. People oF Nagpur are by and large law abiding, peaceful and quite affectionate. But they are less responsive to challenges. Their psychology is that, if things are going in a particular way, then let them continue that way. The people in Nagpur are happy and satisfied lot. Some more endeavour  should be made to make the people more dynamic, more assertive for bettering things rather than be happy with what they have”.

       “This is necessary for developing the economy of Vidarbha.  In 1991, the revenue collection in Vidarbha was 100 crores and in 1991-92. It was 125 crores so the growth process is there but there is substantial scope for further growth”.

       Talking about Vidarbha, he said that  “it is here that Gandhiji floated his Charkha policy. Gandhiji’s idea of Charkha was the more  revolutionary idea than any economics in the world has known”.

      “The Charkha provided meaningfulness to life, and dignity to an individual Charkha in every household would have made every household a centre of productivity, This is what is needed in India, a  creative process of nation building”.

           “If there is productive activity going on in all households, then the young boys and girls won’t engage in unfair means practices and so on”.

      “We should put the Principles of Mahatma Gandhi in practice. The Gandhian thought should be an important component in forming our economic and fiscal policies.”

    Plus & Minus Points

    He smiled when I asked him his plus and minus points. I have so many minus points that if I be the judge, I’d sentence myself with heaviest punishment It is persons of Gandhiji’s caliber who could list their follies for others to benefit from, but ordinary individuals like me cannot expose them to  others I don’t were my heart on my sleeves for fools to stare at “. Mr. Jha srnilingly quoted Othello.

     “As far as my points are concerned, I am on incorrigible optimist. I am happy with whatever life has given me. I believe human potentialities are infinite. I have explored a little and would like to keep on exploring till the curtain falls”.

 

     Rebirth

     “Who would you like to be reborn as? The question had him in deep comtemplation for a long time before he slowly said,  “I never thought of it because I never believed in it I believe in modem physics. I believe that whatever is right in me will remain so even after my  death. Something in me may become the smile of charming young girl, and something else in me may become the frown of a ferocious tiger”.

     “I have never been able to convince myself that there is rebirth, though my father and mother believed in it”. After heading around a lot, he said. “I would like to be born as a human being, but no human being appears to me to be a model who can be accepted without any modification. The liberty to design myself, I keep as my sovereign right”.

     “He’s voracious reader.  Tulsidas and Shakespeare have impressed him the most, though he finds Shakespeare more inviting, and feels more at home in his world.”

      “The world of Tulsidas is one of faith, profound conviction and infinite dedication”, he says, “We live in a world of waste and destruction Thus we have so many friends in the world of Shakespeare, and none in the world of Kalidas,  after Shakespeare He made every story a metaphor and that is something very remarkable.”

 

       “Out of all Shakespeare’s work he  prefers the Shakespeare tragedies, “Macbeth”, Othello”, “Hamlet” etc. They represent the pcak of his creativity. His other favourites  are the  “Old testament,  and the “Ramcharitra Manas”.

       View on God

       “Do you believe in God? I asked him.  “It’s a very tough question”, he mused.  “At times I feel Gods are the most magnificent creations of human eings. Whether they exist or not,  they do have impact”.

    “In moments of distress I get solace when feelings are ruffled, I get Peace. When all is lost I feel profound is still surviving when everyone is gone, something very personal is providing company”.

    “I feel without faith in God, it would be difficult to live as life’s  pangs and sufferings would be unbearable without faith in God. Hope cannot survive and without hope, life cannot be worth living. So I do feel that the most intense creative human imagination created God”.

    “Remembering his days in the hospital, he said:  “When someone is placed on the operation table for some serious operation then one acquires serenity of mind and hope by surrendering oneself to God.”.

     “I perceived my doctor as that and surrendered myself to him. It  is this which sustained me. I believe it is your faith which sustains you. This faith in God is something which supports when all supports are gone”.

     “He compared God to a calmpose tablet saying that both give you peace of mind. He never realized, I suppose that an overdose of the latter leads one straight to God.”

     On Corruption

     “Answering a querry on alleged corruption by revenue collecting authorities, Mr. Jha said: “There is no country in the world where in some measure corruption is not present There are lot of reasons for it, besides the economic reason.”

     “Despite the efforts by the department to eradicate corruption the problem is very much there. Various agencies of the department are functioning to look into the public grievances.  The Grievance Cell in Commissioner’s Office, Central Board of Direct Taxes in New Delhi, Vigilance officers, besides various other government agencies, are  investigating into complaints of corruption.”

      “The general level of performance in dept. is fine though there is scope for improvement. This year a lot of stress is being given for improving our public relations.”

      On Direct Taxes

      “The national revenue from Income Tax is just one or two percent. Why  isn’t it just done away with?   I asked.”        

      “This issue was considered in United Kingdom also. I feel we should not do away with direct taxes. The indirect taxes hit all. Direct taxes are imposed on those capable of bearing the burden. By making them tax payers we make them conscious partners in the development of Nations. So  they should not be done away with.”

    Au Revolr

    “Getting a wee bit emotional in the end, he said “when I first came to Nagpur in 1965 as a Probation Officer, I wrote an article in Nagpur Times on Jean-Paul Sartre who had refused to accept the Nobel Prize for literature. It’s a wonderful coincidence that now when I am leaving Nagpur, Nagpur Times is featuring me”. 

*****